Saturday, November 18, 2017

Assisting Persons Can Have an Agenda

Michelle Carter assisted boyfriend's suicide,
"wanted sympathy, attention"
By Margaret Dore, Esq., MBA

Persons assisting a suicide can have an agenda. Consider Tammy Sawyer, trustee for Thomas Middleton in Oregon. Two days after his death by assisted suicide, she sold his home and deposited the proceeds into bank accounts for her own benefit.[1]

In other US states, reported motives for assisting suicide include: the “thrill” of getting other people to kill themselves; a desire for sympathy and attention; and “want[ing] to see someone die.”[2]

If Victoria Follows Oregon, "Six Months to Live" Will Include Young Adults With Insulin Dependent Diabetes

William Toffler, MD
By Margaret Dore, updated 11/19/17.

On Friday, William Toffler, a physician and professor of family medicine in Oregon, explained the implications of a six months to live criteria proposed for euthanasia/assisted suicide in Victoria. In a letter and declaration to Members of the Legislative Council, Dr. Toffler stated:
In Oregon, a similar six months to live criteria is interpreted to include people with chronic conditions, such as chronic lower respiratory disease and insulin dependent diabetes (more formally known as "diabetes mellitus").

Thursday, November 16, 2017

New South Wales Defeats Assisted Suicide & Euthanasia

NSW Legislative Council
Today, the New South Wales' Upper House voted against a purported "Voluntary Assisted Dying Bill."

The bill would have legalized assisted suicide and euthanasia, on both a voluntary and non-voluntary basis, for dying and non-dying people. The vote was 20 to 19.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

HOPE: Bill in New South Wales Provides For Assisted Suicide and Direct Killing

Dear Friend

The Legislative Council debate on the Voluntary Assisted Dying Bill 2017 will begin today. (11/16/17)

The long title of the Bill states that Bill is about assistance to persons to “end their own lives”.

However, Clause 5 also provides for a medical practitioner or a nurse to directly kill a person by administering a lethal substance to the person.

Friday, November 10, 2017

The Australian: "Patient’s Recovery Convinces Doctor to Fight Euthanasia Laws"

For a pdf version, click here, to  see article as published, click here.

Kenneth Stevens MD, Jeanette Hall
When American doctor Kenneth Stevens heard about Victoria’s plan to introduce assisted dying for the terminally ill he couldn’t help but recall the story of his ­patient Jeanette Hall.

Hall, then 55, came to Stevens in 2000 after being diagnosed with inoperable colon cancer in Portland, Oregon, a state that in 1997 introduced laws enabling doctors to prescribe fatal pills to the terminally ill.