Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Man Convicted of Assisting Wife's Suicide

An Australian man has been convicted of aiding his wife's suicide, after a court heard he had coveted payouts from her life insurance.
Jennifer Morant, 56, had suffered from chronic pain but was not terminally ill when she died in 2014, a court heard.
A jury found that Graham Morant, 69, counselled and aided his wife to take her life. He had denied both charges.

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Euthanasia Bill Defeated

"[T]he title of their legislation
gave the game away."
By Denis Strangman

In a narrow vote the Australian Senate today (Thursday) defeated by 36-34 a move to permit the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory to enact laws on euthanasia and assisted suicide. Most of the Australian media was campaigning for the pro-euthanasia move. A lot of work went on in the background with the group established by Paul Russell (Hope) encouraging a joint-Party meeting for Senators and staff to hear from two experienced Doctors from Victoria.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Victoria's Euthanasia Bill Not What it Was Promised to Be

Fabian Stahle, of Sweden, has issued a thoughtful and detailed report regarding Oregon's six months of live criteria, which is determined in practice to include people with years to live, and not necessarily on a voluntary basis.

The material below is on page 4 of his report, regarding Victoria, which recently enacted a similar standard. I urge readers to also consider his entire report at this link.

Monday, December 4, 2017

Is Self-Administration Enforceable?

By Margaret Dore, Esq.

Victoria's deceptively named Voluntary Assisted Dying Bill uses the term, "self-administer," at least 30 times.[1] Indeed, self-administration of the lethal dose was a major selling point of the bill, to convince the public and Parliament that patients would be in control.

But, the term is not defined.

Sunday, November 26, 2017

Wrap Up Australia

Rachel Carling-Jenkins, Victoria MP
Two weeks ago, the Upper House of New South Wales defeated a bill seeking to legalise assisted suicide and euthanasia.[1] Last week, Victoria's Upper House went the opposite direction, voting to approve a similar bill 22 to 18.[2]

The vote in Victoria was disappointing, but featured a marathon debate in which MPs, such as Rachel Carling-Jenkins, focused on what the bill actually said and did, which is not what proponents claim.

The Victoria bill is expected to return to the Lower House to address amendments.